Some employees in the Louisville, Kentucky, area may have experienced discrimination in the workplace. Workers at all levels of employment may face discrimination during their careers, and discrimination could happen to people of all ages.

A 16-year-old Indiana resident reported discrimination at her workplace, claiming that she had experienced racial comments directed at her from her co-workers after reporting to her supervisor that a white customer requested a server who was not black. The worker, who is black, stated that she quit her job at Olive Garden because she could no longer work in an environment that she felt was toxic, especially since she feared retaliation from other employees and supervisors for speaking out.

In this case, it may appear as if the discrimination is obvious; however, some situations might not be so clear. It may be difficult to prove that someone is being discriminated against because of race or ethnicity. For example, it could be challenging to ascertain why someone was or was not hired although researching the employer’s past hiring patterns might help.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlaws discrimination against five protected classes: race, religion, sex, color and national origin. Title VII of the act prohibits employers from doing the following based on race: failing or refusing to hire someone, disciplining or firing an employee, providing fewer benefits or reduced pay, and failing to provide promotions or opportunities. Title VII also prevents segregation of employees based on race. Although states may differ in their legislation concerning discrimination, every state must adhere to this federal law.

Kentucky has many laws against discrimination that support and complement current federal laws. Speaking with knowledgeable and experienced legal counsel who understands federal and state employment laws may be helpful for those who feel that they have been discriminated against in the workplace.